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    3 ways to manage your second-highest expense

    If you're looking to make your practice more profitable (who isn't?), start with your biggest expenses.

     

    1. Timing

    Every type of transaction has an ideal timeframe to start the process. When starting too early or too late, you communicate to the landlord or seller that you don’t really know what you’re doing. When that message is communicated, it hurts your ability to receive the best possible terms.

    For example, don’t wait for your landlord to approach you on a lease renewal negotiation. Start by consulting with a professional so you can understand the ideal timeframe to start your transaction, come up with a specific game plan for what you want to achieve, and then you be the one to approach your landlord with renewal terms.

    2. Representation

    Landlords and sellers prey on unrepresented tenants who don’t really know the market or what their options are. If the tenant was a Fortune 500 company, the landlord would approach them with a high level of respect, expecting that they either have a real estate broker hired to represent them or have a team of professionals internally that are well equipped to handle the transaction.

    In contrast, when a landlord or seller starts speaking with a tenant who isn’t represented, and who they don’t believe knows the market as well as they do, that tenant is not going to get the same level of respect through the process. This is because the landlord senses an opportunity to take advantage of a small tenant who is not an expert, doesn’t have a full complement of real estate knowledge and skills, and who doesn’t have adequate representation.

    Related article: Five myths your landlord wants you to believe

    When you understand that commissions are paid in commercial real estate just like they are in residential real estate—they are set aside in advance for two parties, not just one—then you understand there aren’t any savings by not having a broker. And if there aren’t any savings by not having a broker, then showing up without one only further detracts from your credibility.

    3. Leverage and posture

    It is nearly impossible to emerge victorious from a negotiation without leverage and posture which are created by having multiple options in the market. If you limit yourself to one property, you are at the mercy of that owner. Since most landlords and sellers negotiate professionally, it is easy for them to know when you don’t have other viable options.

    Simply telling a landlord that you have a proposal from another landlord won’t give you a strong enough posture. Most landlords look at unrepresented tenants and assume they do not know the market, do not understand all their options, and are not really serious about making the landlord compete for their business.

    Leverage and posture are created when you have the right timing, professional representation, an understanding of all your available options and a detailed game plan of what you want to accomplish in order to capitalize on the market.

    These three key ideas are the first of many factors that allow healthcare tenants and buyers to reduce their second highest expense — which dramatically impacts profitability and cash flow.

    Carr Healthcare Realty
    Carr Healthcare Realty is the nation’s leading provider of commercial real estate services for healthcare tenants and buyers. Every ...

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