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    What is emotional intelligence and how it does it affect a dental practice?

    Is there reason some clinically skilled dentists just don’t quite make it financially? What is the difference between two doctors who sat beside each other for four years in dental school? The author explains.

    Is there reason some clinically skilled dentists just don’t quite make it financially? What is the difference between two doctors who sat beside each other for four years in dental school? Some are experts in their diagnosis and treatment, but seem to struggle with the ability to convince patients they need comprehensive work.

    The same holds true in all businesses. Executives can have excellent schooling and their IQ is out the roof, but something separates those who have stellar careers and those who end up working for the stars.

    In the early 1980s, there was a concept born that EQ was equally important as IQ. Daniel Goleman wrote a book, “ Emotional Intelligence,” that theorized that knowing one’s own emotions, emotional self-control, motivation and persistence, recognizing emotions of others and successfully handling relationship, were characteristics that affected a person’s success as much as IQ.

    More from the author: 7 behavioral clues that lead to increased treatment acceptance

    In the 1970s, Dr. Bob Barkley, wrote about “co-diagnosis,” talking about forming a relationship with your patients, gaining their trust, and together, coming to a mutual decision about what was the best dental solution for their long-term dental health.

    As I attended seminars by Dr. Peter Dawson and then the continuum at LD Pankey Institute, there was the part of the balance called “Know Your Patient.”

    I have attended numerous practice management seminars and had leading consulting firms come to my office to teach me about treatment presentation, new patient experiences, and the business systems that will help me become more productive. I have also studied DiSC personality styles and generational differences and the way I need to approach patients so that I can gain their trust and they accept treatment.

    More from the author: 5 things to do before you call a consultant

    I think there is a very strong correlation with a person’s EQ and their ability to successfully “co-diagnose.” If we look at some of those qualities in a person, I think we can see why some people thrive and some don’t.

    Read more on the next page...

    David Black
    Drawing on over 40 years of clinical experience, Dr. Black focuses on speaking and coaching through in-office consultation. Dr. Black ...

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